Book Meme

May. 20th, 2009 09:26 pm
darkrivertempest: (Hermey Reading)
[personal profile] darkrivertempest
Okay, so I've seen this on quite a few of my F-list, but last seen on [livejournal.com profile] debris4spike

List 16 books that will always stick with you. Thanks Deb - D'uh, I'm such an idiot!



1)Wuthering Heights - by Emily Brontë
I can't read this book or watch this movie without my soul deeply responding to it. Most times I want to throttle Cathy. Period.

2)Jane Eyre - by Charlotte Brontë
The obstacles Jane has to overcome to find happiness would've destroyed a woman of lesser spirit. I consider her one of my idols. Plus Rochester is all kinds of broody. That helps.

3)Sense and Sensibility - by Jane Austen
I love this one more than Pride and Prejudice, though I dearly love both. When I first read it, I identified with Marianne, but as I grew older, I knew I was very much like Elinor. Again, I want to slap Marianne for her indifference to Col. Brandon, but as with all people, she needed to learn her life-lesson in order to be worthy of the relationship.

4)Night - by Elie Wiesel
A first-hand account of the prison camps Auschwitz and Buchenwald, it is a miracle that he survived to tell his tale. My husband is half Jewish and lost his great-aunt to a concentration camp, so this book resonates very strongly with me, even though I read it over 20 years ago.

5)Hamlet - by William Shakespeare
Angst, murder, plots within plots, more angst, unrequited love (poor Ophelia), and some of the most recognizable phrases of the English language spew forth from what I consider Shakespeare's greatest work.

6)Outlander - by Diana Gabaldon
This currently six-book series is so engrossing; I couldn't put the first book down (which was about or just over 900 pages) until I'd read the whole bloody thing in about two days. By then, I was a weeping mess and I knew more about Scottish history than I ever thought possible! Book 7, Echo in the Bone, should be out later this year.

7)Harry Potter - by J.K. Rowling
D'uh? Although I didn't start reading the books until after the second movie, I was kinda forced to by an ex-boyfriend of mine to read at least the ones that had been published by the release of the third movie, or else he wouldn't take me to see them. Bastard. So I read them, dumped him, and went by myself and had a glorious time of it. Needless to say, I never looked back and I still don't like what J.K. did with the epilogue (not quite swallowing that one), but I write fanfic to correct that. :D

8)Haunted Ohio - by Chris Woodyard
I actually have autographed copies of the five-book series! I don't normally get the chills reading ghost stories - either because I'm used to stuff like that or the story is just too urban legend-ish. But these encounters? HOLY MOLEY! I had to sleep with the lights on several times after reading a particular chapter. *wipes sweaty brow* The author is local and the stories are from Ohio, so it is near and dear to my heart.

9)Uncle John's Bathroom Reader - multiple contributors
You may scoff, but to just sit on the sofa and read a bunch of trivia is an awesome past-time for me! There's at least twenty editions, so there's no lack of knowledge, and they come out with a new one each year. It's like crack for bookworms.

10)This Present Darkness - by Frank Peretti
It's actually a two-book series, the sequel is Piercing the Darkness. Peretti is a Christian fiction writer that will scare the pants off of you. This series is about the war waged between Heaven and Hell, everyday for our souls. Angels and Demons, both in turn, whispering things in our ears to gain the upper hand. If you've read Hunter's Bane, I draw a LOT of my inspiration from these two books. Debra, you'd like `em! ;)

11)The Other Boleyn Girl - by Philipa Gregory
Although a great deal of this story is fiction, it's based largely on the fact of Anne Boleyn's sister, Mary. It was made into a movie, but I found that rather lacking, especially when it came to describing Mary's relationship with William Stafford.

12)Frankenstein - by Mary Shelley
This horror classic is by far the best warning man has for meddling where God is supreme. Once cannot help but empathize with the creature that Frankenstein creates out of misplaced hubris or obsession with science versus what just shouldn't be done.

13)Dracula - Bram Stoker
Even though there were legends of the 'undead' long before Stoker wrote his novel, this classic brought all the legends to the forefront and exposed the vampires to the public at large. If you've never read the novel that began it all, I highly suggest you do. I happen to own an original, cloth-bound copy from England - it is my most prized possession.

14)The Collected Works of Edgar Allen Poe - by Edgar Allen Poe
Besides inventing the 'detective-fiction' genre, Poe wrote poems and short stories, most macabre in nature. By far, my favorites are The Raven and Murders in the Rue Morgue. How darkly clever.

15)The Picture of Dorian Gray - by Oscar Wilde
Could you imagine how deeply depraved society could become if only their mirror image aged and rotted with their sins? An early lesson on deals with the Devil. Always read the fine print.

16)The Prophet - by Kahlil Gibran
One of the most stunning pieces of literature I've come across, and one of the most profound meditations of life and the human condition, on how it should/could be if we looked at things the way God does. Twenty-six poetic essays on everything ranging from birth to death, and beyond.

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